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31 Google Advanced Search Tips to Help You Find What You’re Looking For

Portrait of clever student in university library.

If you’re anything like me, you probably use Google many times every day. But, unless you’re a technological buff, you’re probably still using Google in its most basic version.

If your current Google experience consists of putting in a few phrases and modifying your query until you discover what you’re searching for, I’m here to tell you that there’s a better approach – and it’s not difficult to learn.

On the other hand, even if you are a technological geek who already knows how to use Google like a pro, I recommend you save this post of Google advanced search techniques. Then, when you’re ready to rip your hair out in despair while watching a beginner repeatedly put in simple inquiries in a frantic effort to discover anything, you’ll have the recommendations on hand.

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The Google advanced search recommendations that follow are based on my personal experience and things that I find helpful. I’ve kept the explanations of the search suggestions purposefully brief, since you’re likely to pick up on most of them just by glancing at the Google example.

Here’s a Rundown of Some of the Most Effective Google Search Shortcuts. You’ll Be a Google Search Pro in No Time

31 Google Advanced Search Techniques

1. Explanatory Phrase

Assume you’re looking for inbound marketing material on Google. Instead than merely entering inbound marketing into the Google search box, you’re probably better off looking for the keyword specifically. Simply surround the search query in double quotations to do this.
Search Term: inbound marketing

2.Remove Words

Assume you want to look for articles concerning inbound marketing but you don’t want any results that include the phrase advertising. Simply use the – symbol in front of the term you wish to omit to accomplish this.
Inbound marketing -advertising is an example of a search term.

3. EITHER THIS OR THAT

When you make a search, Google will include all of the search phrases by default. You may use the OR operator to find any one of one or more words that match. (Note that the OR must be capitalised.)
Inbound marketing OR advertising as an example of a search

4. Textual Elements

If you wish to locate a page where all of the keywords you’re looking for exist in the text (but not necessarily next to each other), enter allintext: followed immediately by words or phrases.
Search Example: allintext:vermont ski house lake

5. Text words + title, URL, etc.

If you wish to locate a website where one phrase occurs in the page’s text and another term appears elsewhere on the page, such as the title or URL, put that first term followed by intext: followed immediately by the other term.
Example Search: neil diamond red sox in context

6. Title Words

Want to discover a page with certain terms in the title (but not necessarily next to each other)? Enter allintitle: immediately followed by words or phrases.
Search Example: allintitle:wine club

7. Title + Text, URL, and So Forth

Want to identify a page where one phrase occurs in the title but another appears elsewhere on the page, such as in the content or the URL? Enter the first term, followed by intitle:, and then the second term.
Search Example: flu shot intitle:advice

8. Keywords in the URL

If you want to locate sites that have your search query in the URL, write allinurl: followed by your search query.
Search Example: allinurl:Relevate blog

9. How to Conduct a Website Search

Frequently, you’ll want to search a certain website for information that matches a specific term. Even if the site has an in-built search capability, you may utilise Google to search for your phrase. Simply add the site:somesite.com modifier to your URL. (To understand how to accomplish this in further detail, see this blog article.)
Example of a Search: www.smallbusinesshub.com

10. Related Search

Use the related:somesite.com modifier to identify new websites with content similar to one you already know about.
Search Example: related:visual.ly

11. A Page That Contains a Link to Another Page

Assume you wish to find every website that mentions a BuzzFeed article on their website. To do so, use the link: command, followed by the name of a page. Google will return any sites that have a link to BuzzFeed’s main website. The more exact the URL, the fewer and more focused the results will be.
Search as an example: link:buzzfeed

12. Similar and Synonymous Words

Assume you want to include a term in your search, but you also want to include results that include related or synonym words. To do so, use the in front of the term.
Professional inbound marketing is an example of a search term.

13. Definitions of Words

Simply use the define: command to swiftly search up the meaning of a word or phrase. By tapping the megaphone symbol, you may hear the word’s pronunciation.
Search For instance, define:plethora

14. Missing Words

Have you ever forgotten a word or two from a certain phrase, song lyric, movie quotation, or anything else? An asterisk* may be used as a wildcard to assist you discover the missing word in a sentence.
Much * about nothing is an example of a search.

15. News in a Specific Area

If you want to get news about a certain place, use the location: command to search Google News for articles about that location.
Search For instance, the setting of Star Wars is London.

16. Particular Document Types

If you want to discover results of a certain kind, you may use the filetype: modifier. You could, for example, wish to locate just PowerPoint presentations on inbound marketing.
Inbound marketing filetype:ppt is an example of a search term.

17. Translations

Do you need to translate a single word or phrase from one language to another? There’s no need to visit a translation website. Simply search for [word] to [language].
Example of a Search: krankenwagen to English

18. Listing of Phone Numbers

Assume you get a call on your mobile number from someone you don’t recognise. If all you have is a phone number, you may use Google’s phonebook tool to search it up.
Phonebook:617-555-1212 is an example search.

(Note: The number in this example is incorrect. To get any results, you must use a real number.)

19. Lookup by Area Code

If all you need to do is seek up a phone number’s area code, just input the three-digit code and Google will tell you where it’s from.
Example of a Search: 617

20. Lookup by Zip Code

Simply search for the remainder of the address, including the town or city name and state, province, or country, if you need to find for the zip code for an address. It will provide results that include an area code (if applicable),
First St., Cambridge, MA as an example of a search

21. Number Ranges

This is a seldom utilised yet very helpful suggestion. Assume you wish to get results that include any of a set of numbers. You may achieve this by using the X..Y modifier (in case this is difficult to understand, the two periods between the X and Y are what’s between the X and Y are what’s between the X and Y are what’s between the X and Y are what’s between the X and Y are what’ This form of search is excellent for years (as seen below), prices, or any other situation in which you need to supply a sequence of numbers.
President 1940–1950, for example.

22. Stock number (Ticker Symbol)

Simply enter a valid ticker symbol as your search term, and Google will provide you with the stock’s current financials as well as a quick thumbnail chart.
GOOGLE, FOR EXAMPLE

23. Calculator

Instead of bringing up the Calculator applet the next time you need to make a fast calculation, just put your term into Google.
Example of a Search: 48512 * 1.02

24. Tip Calculator (page 24)

Google has a tip calculator in addition to a standard calculator. You may alter the cost, tip percentage, and number of individuals dividing it by searching for tip calculator.
Example of a Search: tip calculator

25. Timer

You don’t have a timer? Google has your back. Simply enter a time and the word timer, and the countdown will begin immediately.
Example of a Search:20-minute timer

26. Stopwatch

When you search for stopwatch, it will bring up a stopwatch for you to start when you’re ready.
Example of a Search: stopwatch

27. Weather

The next time you need instant weather figures or a prediction for a specific place, search for weather followed by a location. Both will appear before the initial search results on Google.
Example of a Search: weather cambridge ma

28. Sunrise and Sunset Hours

If you want to know when the sun will rise and set at a given place that day, conduct a simple Google search with the words dawn or sunset and the location name.
Example of a search: sunrise acadia

29. Flight Statuses

Google will give you the flight details, status, and other useful information if you provide the airline and aircraft number.
Example of a Search: BA 181

30. Sports Schedules and Scores

Do you want to discover the most recent sports scores and upcoming schedules for your favourite teams or match-ups? When you search for a single team name or two team names, Google Sports will display scores and schedules before the first search results.
Example of a Search: Manchester United

31. Food Comparison Believe it or not,

if you’re ever interested how two kinds of (pretty general) meals compare, you can run a fast Google search to learn how they vary in calories, fat, protein, cholesterol, salt, potassium, and other nutrients.
Example of a Search: pizza versus broccoli

Author

Casper

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